The Legacy (1978) Review

The Legacy (1978)

Directed by Richard Marquand

Starring: Katharine Ross, Sam Elliott, Roger Daltrey, Katharine Ross, John Standing, Ian Hogg, Margaret Tyzack, Charles Gray, Lee Montague, Hildegard Neil, Marianne Broome

Plot Synopsis: (via IMDb)
A millionaire, a million-dollar prostitute, a star-maker, a nation-killer, a woman whose lusts are as cold as graveyard snow. Five of the most powerful people in the world, and Maggie (Katharine Ross) makes six, gather in an ancient mansion to inherit a Legacy of bloodsome horror.

My Opinion:

Not gonna lie – I watched this because Sam Elliott is in it. He plays two of my all-time favorite studs: Gar in Mask (I adore that film) and Wade Garrett in Road House (BEST “so bad it’s good” movie EVER). The Legacy is definitely dated but has a good 1970’s horror look & feel, which I always appreciate. A lot of my favorite horror films are from that decade. But, more importantly, it’s has Elliott’s bare ass. How have I gone this many years without seeing Elliott’s bare ass??

I also wanted to see him with his wife Katharine Ross. They began dating when making this film and have been married since 1984. Another reason to love Elliott! A Hollywood couple who have stayed together! It makes me love him as much as Paul Newman. They do have lovely chemistry in this. Ross is truly the star of this movie; She’s the best thing about this otherwise average and not particularly memorable film. It’s strange that she didn’t end up a massive star after starting out in some very big films but maybe they both prefer to keep a low profile. It probably helps them survive the usual Hollywood fame drama & bullshit.

Reason number three to watch this: Roger Daltrey. I like Daltrey & The Who and find his “acting” thoroughly amusing. One of my favorite things I’ve ever reviewed on this blog was an episode of Tales Of The Crypt, starring Daltrey & a young Steve Buscemi (Forever Ambergris – review HERE). His, um, acting in The Legacy is as wonderfully bad as always. I wish he’d had a bigger role. Besides Ross & Elliott, the rest of the characters are underused and underdeveloped.

I’d hoped to enjoy this film more. It’s not great. The story was silly and a bit of a mess. To be fair, I think the idea behind the story was fine but the movie didn’t do a very good job presenting it. It could’ve been a really good film with a dark & atmospheric tone, which would suit the somewhat “Satanic” storyline. I love a good Satanic horror! But it felt very lightweight. You never felt any true sense of horror like you did with Rosemary’s Baby. And the nurse lady and that damn cat should’ve been way more creepy than they were. What’s more creepy than a demonic nurse and evil cat?!

I think The Legacy had a lot of potential and could’ve possibly become a horror classic in different hands. I was disappointed overall but it does have some positives with two good leading performances and a fun Agatha Christie-style murder mystery set in a creepy house. I can see why it might have some fans but you’re not going to like it if you’re not a fan of 70’s horror films. I am, so I’m glad I finally checked this one out even if I was a little disappointed. And I got to see Sam Elliott’s bum.

My Rating: 6/10

I might have to add Sam Elliott’s naked butt shower scene to My Top Ten Shower & Bath Scenes In Movies list…

Donnie Darko (2001) IMDB Top 250 Guest Review

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Today’s IMDB Top 250 Guest Review comes from Liam of Liam Does Film. Thanks for joining in, Liam! 🙂 Now let’s see what he has to say about Donnie Darko, IMDB rank 176 out of 250…

There are still some movies up for grabs if anyone wants to do a guest IMDB Top 250 review. You can find the list of remaining films HERE. See the full list & links to all the reviews that have already been done HERE. I’ve stopped receiving so many guest reviews now so if you send yours soon, it should post soon. I only have enough for the next month.

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Donnie Darko (2001)

Genre: Drama, Sci-Fi

Director: Richard Kelly

Writer: Richard Kelly

Starring: Jake Gyllenhaal, Jena Malone, Mary McDonell, Holmes Osbourne

Rating: ★★★★★

Those who have said bad things about this film have just not understood it. Donnie Darko is that film where you’ll find yourself watching it over and over looking for the explanation; on the way you will then discover just how good this film is and why it’s rated as one of the best of all time, deservedly being on IMBD’s top 250, among many critics, including myself, personal favourites. It has an amazing cast; a young Jake Gyllenhaal plays the character of Donnie, after he will star in award winning films such as Brokeback Mountain and The Day After Tomorrow. Future Batman star Maggie Gyllenhaal, Jake’s actual sister, plays Elizabeth Darko whilst we also get to see the well-known Patrick Swayze alongside Drew Barrymore. However it isn’t just the cast, a well-written story which dives into the world of complexity and defines the phrase thought-provoking, makes Donnie Darko hard to forget, and for me it is simply brilliant in every aspect and sense of the word.

Donnie Darko (Jake Gyllenhaal), is a far from ordinary teenager, suffering from hallucinations Donnie starts to be visited by a demonic six foot rabbit named Frank, who manipulates him to commit a series of crimes, however Frank’s arrival into Donnie’s life is more important than first thought. At the dinner table his sister Elizabeth (Maggie Gyllenhaal) tells his parents (Mary McDonell, Holmes Osbourne) that he hasn’t been taking his medication, however later that night due to these visions Donnie escapes death as a 747 Jet engine crashes and destroys his bedroom whilst he’s on a midnight trip with Frank. Frank tells him that the world is going to end in “28 days, 6 hours, 42 minutes and 12 seconds”, The mystery grows as the jet engine is unknown by the FBI creating the question of where exactly did it come from? All that is known is that Donnie’s escape from death and Frank’s appearance are two supernatural events that have crossed and are somehow linked, and as Donnie is enlightened to a whole new way of thinking, he then realises the truth behind Frank’s words.

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The story fuels from a “countdown” method, as each day passes we get closer to a predicted doomsday. However it is what the film gives us in those days that are great, not only are a string of relationships and subplots introduced but a series of clues in which just like Donnie, we have to piece together. As stories develop our characters all become very likable, something that Donnie Darko benefits from greatly, Donnie himself is loveable; lost, bold and witty, whilst the same aspects are all shared by his sister Elizabeth, newly found girlfriend Gretchen (Jena Malone) and his English teacher played by the seemingly ageless Drew Barrymore. The film keeps you on the edge, with a mixture of unexpected, dark plots balanced by strangely comedic moments. Richard Kelly for me deserves a huge amount of credit, as Donnie Darko holds such an amazing story.

Jake Gyllenhaal soon became one of my favourite actors after his role as Donnie; it is flawless, creating and portraying one of the most memorable teen characters for me since Ferris Bueller. There is something very likable but at the same time relatable with his character and Jake brings it to life superbly. The rest of the cast are great, Jena Malone portrays Gretchen well with it seeming very natural, whilst also providing one of the memorable quotes and scenes, “you’re weird … that was a compliment”. Drew Barrymore as Donnie’s English teacher is great, she provides a laughable aspect, whilst Patrick Swayze portrays the not so lovable Jim Cunningham well as you would expect of such talent, rounding off a truly remarkable ensemble; which even includes a hidden Seth Rogen.

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This film does well to provide everything from comedy moments to suspense, thrills and gasps fulfilling so many aspects with even the soundtrack becoming an iconic element. Maybe when watched a few times you seem to pick up on Kelly’s details, and the soundtrack is brilliant as each song and piece of score predicts what’s happening next or compliments the events on the screen. The songs of choice all seem very fitting too, with Mad World becoming nostalgic after time.

Donnie Darko should be known for a long time to come, and hopefully it will be as Richard Kelly’s first film shines in every way it could have. A brilliant story, portrayed by a great acting ensemble, whilst everything else fitting perfectly around the two makes Donnie Darko in my eyes flawless, and my favourite film of all time. Entertaining, thrilling and funny, complex and thought-provoking are some of the things this film can be described as, but overall it is a master-piece which will be sure to be your favourite, or your new obsessive guilty pleasure, deservedly being rated as one of the all-time greats.

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