Monty Python And The Holy Grail & Life Of Brian IMDB Top 250 Guest Review

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Today’s special DOUBLE IMDB Top 250 Guest Review comes from Cameron of Cameron’s Pit Of Terror. He also reviewed Pan’s Labyrinth HERE. Thanks for the reviews, Cameron! 🙂 Now let’s see what he has to say about Monty Python classics Monty Python And The Holy Grail, IMDB rank 84 out of 250 and Life Of Brian, IMDB rank 162 out of 250…

There are still some movies up for grabs if anyone wants to do a guest IMDB Top 250 review. You can find the list of remaining films HERE. See the full list & links to all the reviews that have already been done HERE.

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Simply utter the words ‘Monty Python’ to anyone and they’ll either spend the next hour reciting phrases about dead parrots and the Spanish Inquisition in a faux-English accent (even if they’re English themselves), or they’ll groan and shake their head. There is no inbetween. Yet none of them will say “Who?”. Monty Python have created for themselves the definition of a cult following, all around the world. Monty Python’s Flying Circus, first screened on BBC in 1969, was a sketch show made by and starring the 6 middle-class young men with a razor-sharp sense of humour that was anarchic, satirical, self-referential, often completely stupid, and most of the time a combination of all of these. The naïve BBC didn’t know what they’d signed off on, but audiences loved it. Running for four series, the troupe found themselves making a big-screen outing, based on the legends of King Arthur; Monty Python and the Holy Grail.

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I wasn’t alive until many years after this film was released so I can only imagine the reaction in cinemas as it opens with the ‘wrong’ film; Dentist on the Job starts before a projectionist is heard muttering about playing the wrong film. The ‘correct’ film starts now, but the opening credits have been tampered with by, for some reason, Swedish pranksters. If anyone sitting in the cinema had any preconception that they were going to be watching a straight-forward, linear movie with a few funny jokes they would by that point have stood (or sat) corrected. This subversive, completely barmy tone is carried throughout the film with constant wordplay and downright stupidity, but there is such a devoted commitment to the silliness that makes it far funnier than most other comedies, even today. The plot is rather bare – if dissected it’s perhaps a collection of sketches set around a vague storyline, but in practice it manages to feel somewhat coherent, even if you have no idea why what’s happening is happening. Most fans of this film (myself included) could recite the movie from beginning to end, but somehow on repeat viewings it still manages to be eye-wateringly hilarious. This provides a welcome contrast to The Flying Circus – as anyone who has sat through whole episodes or indeed whole series, if they’re completely honest, will attest to it can be hit and miss at least; often the humor is derived directly from the fact that a sketch is not working, that they simply ran out of ideas, or jokes that aren’t particularly funny the first time are dragged out. Such is the case with such a unique brand of surreal humour spread out across 45 episodes. In this film, however, there isn’t a single joke that misfires, the timing and delivery from the crew (who play almost every part) is just perfect. Despite the film being consistently silly, there are a number of surprisingly clever jokes at the expense of the social systems of the era and of other similarly-set historical films. There are moments where the society of the film’s setting is explored and the Pythons’ keen eyes for finding the absurd in everyday life & people makes it feel like it could actually be one of the most authentic depictions of medieval Britain on film. Made on a ridiculously low budget, the stories from behind the scenes tell tales of stress and despair but on screen it appears to embrace the limitation, most notably with the now ubiquitous coconut hooves providing two long-running gags, special effects being provided by Terry Gilliam’s paper-cutout animations, and an ending that takes the previously mentioned subversion to an extreme. Looking at it critically, it could be argued that it looks like a group of friends wrote a script and threw together a movie with whatever limited resources they had available. But I think that the long-lasting, timeless appeal is that that’s precisely what it is.

With The Holy Grail proving a huge success, the Pythons were unable to give an interview without being asked what their next film would be about. Legend has it that Eric Idle became tired of saying, truthfully, that they didn’t have one planned and told them their working title was “Jesus Christ – Lust for Glory” to shut them up. Soon however, it occurred to the group that they should make their own brand of Biblical Epic, and thus was conceived Monty Python’s Life of Brian.

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With a budget more than 10 times greater than The Holy Grail and the group now having experience in making a feature film, this is a very different film. With a much more linear, fleshed-out plot, on paper it is a ‘proper’ film, having the confidence to be funny through the script rather than with bizarre fourth wall breaking, such as with The Holy Grail’s opening sequence. Despite county councils around the UK, America and beyond sharpening their pitchforks regarding the blasphemy of this movie, it isn’t at all blasphemous in the sense of mocking the teachings of Christianity, actually depicting Jesus a handful of times in a manner nothing short of respectful. It is, however, a scathing depiction of those who follow religion blindly. Perhaps it was this troubling mirror image that was the root of such outrage. At any rate it was banned in a long list of places, including all of Ireland and Norway, prompting the Swedish publicity to read “So funny it was banned in Norway!”.

Picking up from a sequence in The Holy Grail where a left-wing peasant chastises King Arthur, a massive portion of this film features ‘The People’s Front of Judea’; a pitch-perfect lampoon of far-left political groups with their infighting (I did have to double-check that I didn’t accidentally mix them up with The Judean People’s Front), unawareness of their own contradictions, and aimlessly taking offence on behalf of other men. “Or women”.

All this talk of how terribly clever it is doesn’t do it the justice of acknowledging how funny it is as well. While the above politically charged moments are in themselves hilarious – and not in a high-and-mighty, sneering sense – for every one of these there is at least one ridiculous character or event in keeping with the classic “Pythonesque” humour of The Flying Circus’ high points and The Holy Grail. The budget allows them to transfer the screenplay to the screen without noticeably cutting corners and giving a production value to the final product that could stand aside certain Biblical Epics, yet the sense of fun from The Holy Grail isn’t lost. The 6 pythons still play a vast number of characters, Terry Gilliam provides one or two surreal animated sequences and there’s a feeling here, even more prevalent than in The Holy Grail, that they’re having a great time making it. One scene in particular features Michael Palin’s Pontius Pilate growing more and more angry as his prisoners and guards laugh at his friend Biggus Dickus’ name (see, it’s not all high-brow humour); as he taunts the guards, Palin himself is visibly an inch away from cracking up. It doesn’t even feel like it needs excused as a campy, old-school charm, the hilarity is truly infectious. Every bit as quotable as The Holy Grail, the film ends on what must be the most recognisable image from all of Monty Python’s work: the crucifixion of a number of characters singing ‘Always Look on the Bright Side of Life’. It encapsulates the whole movie; it comes completely out of nowhere, it is absolutely hilarious at face value but has a very cynical undercurrent to it that once or twice boils to the surface, cheekily poking at certain feelings within many of us without being so harsh that it stops us from laughing, rather forcing us to laugh at ourselves. It is this carefully balanced humour that prevents the more politically charged moments from being cruel.

The Pythons produced two other films in the form of sketches tied together, making these two their only ‘proper’ films. The big question for many fans of these films is often “Which one’s your favourite?” and I couldn’t pick.  Individually they are fantastic, but taken together they provide three hours of non-stop laughter, such a wide variety of humour with a number of ideas and a general tone linking them. I wouldn’t hesitate to say both of them are amongst the funniest films ever made, so to pick a ‘favourite’ would be an injustice to the other.

But it’s probably Life of Brian. No, The Holy Gra- *thrown into a ravine*

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My Top Thirty TV Shows (30-21)

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In recent years, I’ve found that I have less & less time to devote to watching TV shows. Plus, half the time I start watching a new show, it’s cancelled after one season & I’m pissed off at having wasted my time. So when I have any spare time these days, I watch a movie instead and, of course, that’s what 90% of this blog is all about anyway. But I LOVED TV as a kid! And I still make time for the occasional show (The Walking Dead & The Good Wife are the main two that I currently watch). So many movie bloggers have been posting about TV shows lately and I feel really left out as I don’t watch them (Game Of Thrones being the main one. I’ll make the time someday, people!). So I figured I’d do a top ten of my all-time favorite TV shows. Well, it turns out that I wasn’t able to narrow it down to only ten. So…

Here, counting down, are 30-21 of My All-Time Top Thirty TV Shows. (Stay tuned for 20-11 being posted on Wednesday and 10-1 on Friday, by which point you’ll be sick of me). 🙂

30. Highlander

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I liked it! Duncan was hot (even though the ponytail was kind of weird). And you have to admit the show was better than all but the first movie…

29. Fawlty Towers

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My first introduction to a British TV show after moving to the UK (Monty Python doesn’t count – all Americans have seen that). It was close between including this one or Only Fools & Horses. Both are great but I think this one is slightly better.

28. The Wonder Years

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I think a very big part of the reason I liked this was that it made me think of Stand By Me, one of my favorite movies ever. And I loved the time period in which it was set. Plus the music was great!

27. The X-Files

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I couldn’t WAIT to see this every week. But I have to admit I got bored with the overall “alien abduction” storyline and far preferred the individual stories about other weird & wonderful shit.

26. My Name Is Earl

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This. Show. Is. Freaking. Hilarious. I don’t find many things all that funny and this was the first “sitcom” I’d liked in YEARS. I miss good sitcoms. Plus they’re short – I have time for that!

25. Quantum Leap

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This show had the BEST concept! Well executed as well. Very original. And I love shows with such different stories each week. Such a fun watch.

24. Growing Pains

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Leave me alone. Being the age I am, I’d be a complete liar if I didn’t include this. Hehehe… “Boner”…

23. The Facts Of Life

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Again, it’s my age talking but I LOVED this show! I wanted to BE Jo. Jo was cool.

22. Monty Python’s Flying Circus

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So many classic skits (and many bad ones, just like with SNL). But the good ones are brilliant, making us forget all the rest.

21. Saturday Night Live

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Since moving to the UK over a decade ago, I no longer see this as it isn’t shown here. We all have our favorite SNL years, mostly according to our age. My favorite years were, naturally, the ones that brought us WAYNE’S WORLD and two of my all-time favorite characters. Like with Monty Python above, SNL has made some utter shite over the years but the classic skits more than make up for those not-so-funny ones.

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**As I said above, I’ll be posting 20-11 on Wednesday and 10-1 on Friday. As usual, I’ll have IMDB Top 250 Guest Reviews on Tuesday & Thursday. One is of a Hitchcock classic & one is the first movie that’s part of a beloved trilogy. The same blogger has reviewed all three, which I’ll post over the next three weeks. This IMDB thing has been so much fun – thanks again to everyone who has contributed! 🙂

My Top Five Severed Limbs In Movies

I normally start with my favorite with these lists but I’ll go backwards for this one, starting with number five:

5. Planet Terror

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Because, really, what’s cooler than a machine gun for a leg?

4. Monty Python And The Holy Grail

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It’s just a flesh wound!

3. Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope

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So many to choose from. Could do an entire list with just Star Wars limbs, hands, etc. But I like the Ponda Baba arm-severing in the Cantina. And Robot Chicken made this one REALLY funny. If I was a Star Wars geek I could go on about the arm on the floor not being the correct one to match what Ponda Baba’s arms actually look like or whatever. But I can’t say I ever noticed. Because I’m a girl and not that geeky. :-p

2. Kill Bill

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Again – so many to choose from in just this one movie. But I’ve gone with poor Sofie Fatale.

1. Teeth

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Okay – I may be stretching it a bit on what’s considered a limb? I won’t go into any detail – not necessary for anyone who’s seen the movie. And I choose the final “severing” in this movie as there’s more than one.

(OMG she didn’t include Evil Dead II! What about Reservoir Dogs? Do ears count? Toes? Big Lebowski? Decapitations? Am I going to get these sort of replies?) 🙂