My Top Ten Color Movies

As I already did My Top Ten Songs With Colors In The Titles, I was naturally going to do movie titles at some point too. The interesting thing is that the color songs are WAY better than the color movies! There were loads of songs I love in that list but I can’t say I totally love many of these movies (although I do really like several).

Oh well! It was still fun making this list. Hopefully I haven’t forgotten an absolute favorite. I suppose a top ten list of actors with colors in their names should be next… Betty White would probably top that list! Betty White rules.

Anyway! Here are My Top Ten Color Movies (counting down from 20 because I’m awkward):

My Top 20:

20. Black Sheep (2006)
19. Red Eye
18. Harold & Kumar Go To White Castle
17. The Red Balloon
16. Men In Black
15. The Hunt For Red October
14. Blue Velvet
13. The Black Cauldron
12. Blue Valentine
11. Meet Joe Black

My Top Ten:

10. Blue Is The Warmest Color

9. Colors

8. White Oleander

7. Silver Bullet

6. A Clockwork Orange

5. Pink Floyd The Wall

4. Yellow Submarine

3. Pretty In Pink

2. The Green Mile

1. Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs

I just couldn’t rank anything higher than a classic Disney film. I miss the old days of Disney! They’ve managed to make some really good films in recent years too but nothing will top the classics for me.

Now, there are so many “Color Movies” that I’m going to have to mention some more.

Honorable Mentions:

Ruby Sparks
Fried Green Tomatoes
The Pink Panther (1963)
Silver Linings Playbook
Dead Snow 2: Red Vs Dead
Red Dawn
Purple Rain
Moulin Rouge
White Men Can’t Jump
Black Christmas
White Christmas
Crimson Tide (although it sounds like it belongs in My Top Ten Period Dramas)
The Black Hole
The Golden Compass

Two Movies I Really Don’t Like:

Blue Ruin (HATE!)
Pitch Black (ugh)

What I’ve Left Out:

There were loads of movies I had to leave out of this list, mostly because I haven’t actually seen them. I’d love to hear suggestions of ones not in this list in case I missed a big one but it’s very likely I just haven’t have seen your suggestions. I’ve been wanting to see the French Three Colors Trilogy films for years (I will someday, I promise!) and I have to once again admit my shame at not seeing Jackie Brown (the only Tarantino besides The Hateful Eight that I haven’t seen).

Finally, I just have to mention how a lot of the movies in this list happen to have amazing soundtracks! The Walter (now Wendy) Carlos score for A Clockwork Orange is one of my all-time favorites. Snow White has great songs, of course, since it’s a classic Disney movie as does Pretty In Pink since John Hughes always had good taste in song choice. Then there are three actual music movies from fantastic artists in this list: The Beatles’ Yellow Submarine, Pink Floyd The Wall, and Prince’s Purple Rain.

But I want to highlight one composer who did four of the films on this list: Thomas Newman. I feel he’s always overlooked yet he’s done so many of my absolute favorite scores for movies such as The Shawshank Redemption, American Beauty, Finding Nemo, and WALL-E. In this list, he scored White Oleander, Fried Green Tomatoes, Meet Joe Black, and The Green Mile.

The Green Mile & Meet Joe Black scores are absolutely brilliant so I wasn’t sure what piece to post but decided to go with Newman’s Whisper Of A Thrill from Meet Joe Black. It’s such a beautiful piece and the movie itself is judged rather harshly at times. I know my hubby likes the film even more than I do – I think it’s a pretty big favorite of his. Part of this will be down to the score, as both of us are suckers for a great score. Have a listen: 🙂

**Quick question: What’s your favorite color? Let me know in the comments! Mine is most definitely GREEN. 🙂

A Clockwork Orange (1971) IMDB Top 250 Guest Review

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Today’s IMDB Top 250 Guest Review comes from Troy of The Review Club. Thanks for the review, Troy! 🙂 Now let’s see what he has to say about A Clockwork Orange, IMDB rank 61 out of 250…

There are still some movies up for grabs if anyone wants to do a guest IMDB Top 250 review. You can find the list of remaining films HERE. See the full list & links to all the reviews that have already been done HERE.

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‘A CLOCKWORK ORANGE’ (1971)

A magnificently disturbing film of sex and violence and the way society views this behaviour. Seen and told through the eyes of the ‘droog’ leader Alex we find ourselves taken from dystopian shots of a futuristic city to a prison and back again. The main character of this nasty, twisted individual is a really interesting one as you do feel a sense of likeness towards him, you can’t help but like his charm and his confidence and the fact he narrates the story is a creative choice that puts you on side with him from the outset as he is telling the story for us.

Stanley Kubrick’s seemingly effortless gliding tracking shots can be found numerous times pulling into and back from characters and locations and it fits with the uneasy dread of something about to happen, it also ties in nicely with the music used throughout the film. The entire film is shot with care and it does look amazing, even messy tower block lobbies and a distant wood with a pig trough are made to look crafted to an inch of their lives. The place has an air of a London vibe but with an odd unsettling futuristic centre, even if this future does look like a more updated vision of the 1970′s, with the colours and the fashion.

The music is one of the strongest points and it has to be concerning the fact that Alex is a fan of music and Ludvig Van in particular. Beethoven’s 9th becomes a symbolic tool later on and the power of it really and disturbingly makes you feel sorry for Alex. Having classical music played over nearly constantly provided a delicate yet assuring punch of authority over everything. It fitted with the assurance of Alex and also gave a case of opposites in seeing violence on screen but hearing something normally associated as pleasant. A brilliant soundtrack of classic material. The use of electronic sounds and synthesisers fits with the future we are presented with and also lets the viewer feel another layer of unease as we hear the sounds – which would have been even more out of this world when the film was first released.

Malcolm McDowell who plays the young whippersnapper who likes the old in-out is utterly compelling and deliciously bad, mad and engaging. He takes you on a journey and you hate him, like him, feel for him. A sort of roller coaster ride as we get taken through the bigger theme of government control and what is right and wrong in terms of treatment for a sick individual. I’d commend McDowell’s performance for the conditioning section of the movie alone. The eyes being clasped open is enough to make me feel queasy and he went through with that and being humiliated on stage where he broke a couple of ribs. That’s commitment to a role or probably Kubrick’s domineering directing getting the best out of his actors. Also the moment where he spontaneously sings Singin’ in the Rain is brilliant and downright awfully evil. McDowell carries the film and also gives a voice over that isn’t unnecessary, its another way to hear the amazingly created language of this story. It all sounds other worldly yet overly British and that’s the main disturbing factor for me that Alex sounds and looks so calm, collected and intelligent, a fearful powerful character that starts off having no limits.

Aside from the middle section being a little of a lull to the film this is a feat of cinematic wonder, sure it’s dark and explicit but it needs to be to provide shock and to make the meddling government theme have any legs to stand on. A twisted orchestra filled movie with the concerning idea of state versus individual fully demonstrated through the eyes of Alex Delarge. A film of importance, vidi it now young chelloveck.

8.5/10

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