Music Video Friday: Ladyhawke – My Delirium 

This week’s music video is My Delirium by Ladyhawke.

Not this one:

But this one (real name Pip Brown):

Although Ladyhawke is an awesome movie, which is why Phillipa Brown named herself after it.

I’ve realized that all my Music Video Friday posts have so far focused on videos that I really like even if I don’t always like the songs as well (such as Blind Melon’s No Rain or Soul Asylum’s Runaway Train). I’ll still mainly post videos that I think are cool but I’ll sometimes post a song that I think is really great.

I’d not seen the video for My Delirium until I decided that I’d like to do a post about it. It’s a decent video – I like the artwork (by artist Sarah Larnach, who also did the artwork for Ladyhawke’s self-titled debut album) and I like that there are a couple of Thelma & Louise references (Pip Brown seems to be a movie fan!). But I really love the song.

Listening to AN ALBUM is such a weird thing these days. It’s not the same without physical CDs (yeah – I know they still exist but who really buys them??). It’s more often about individual singles now & I really miss my teenage years when I’d listen to an entire album that I loved over & over again. In the past decade, there are probably less than ten albums (or five?!) that I’ve listened to in their entirety but Ladyhawke’s album was one of those. I loved the very 80’s vibe of the whole thing. My Delirium, however, was definitely the best single & I’ve been listening to it a lot again since loading more songs back onto my phone. 

Ladyhawke did release a second album in 2012 but I’ll admit that I’ve not checked it out. What can I say? Life gets in the way. I know I often miss out on good current music as you really have to go out of your way to seek it out nowadays (the radio sucks). So I keep returning to old favorites. Have a listen to My Delirium (2008 is pretty recent for me!): :-)

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 2 (2015) Review


Directed by Francis Lawrence

Based on Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins

Starring: Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, Liam Hemsworth, Woody Harrelson, Elizabeth Banks, Julianne Moore, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Jeffrey Wright, Sam Claflin, Jena Malone, Stanley Tucci, Donald Sutherland

Plot Synopsis: (via IMDB)
As the war of Panem escalates to the destruction of other districts by the Capitol, Katniss Everdeen, the reluctant leader of the rebellion, must bring together an army against President Snow, while all she holds dear hangs in the balance.

My Opinion:

Well, I was attempting to take a week off from blogging but I just watched the final Hunger Games film so figured I should say something about it before the weekend (I also watched Steve Jobs this week but a review for that can wait until next week). Hmmmmmmmm……. Mockingjay – Part 2………….. What can I say? I want to stay very spoiler-free, even for those who’ve read the books as I’m sure the readers will be very curious to know if certain things get changed. But I’m not going to tell you! I can say that I’ve read the books and was a very big fan (of the first two, at least. like most people). I also think the first two films are very good. These final two, though? Well… I’ll get to that more in a bit.

What’s interesting is that my husband, who hasn’t read the books, had quite a different reaction to this film than I did. He thought the first two were good but did NOT like these final two. He had a lot to say about it but I’m not going to go into any of that – I just find it interesting that he disliked these final two so much & wonder if others who haven’t read the books will have the same reaction that he did. I think they probably will. I think they’ll feel exactly the same way about the final two films as us book readers felt about the final book.

I think The Hunger Games book trilogy is fantastic. I know it’s “YA”, which puts some people off. But it’s nothing like things such as Twilight – Collins is a great writer and the first two books are two of my very favorites that I’ve read in the past decade or so. Yeah – the first two. Not the final book. I think most readers felt the same way about that one.

I don’t know how to go about reviewing this movie as, for me, it’s impossible to review it on its own & not compare it to the book. No, I didn’t like the final book. So… I was never going to love the final two movies (not helped by the fact that splitting one book into two movies pisses me the hell off). As a whole, though, these movies are quite faithful adaptations & that’s always very important to me. It’s been a long time since I read these but Mockingjay – Part 2 is very faithful from what I remember (without giving away to the books’ readers whether or not anything big was changed). So, I can’t fault the two Mockingjay films. They did what they could with them and remained pretty loyal to the source material. Which is great! It’s just unfortunate that the source material isn’t so great.

I haven’t reviewed the first film as I wasn’t blogging yet but I reviewed Catching Fire (HERE) and Mockingjay – Part 1 (HERE). Catching Fire was really good (I gave it 8/10) but Mockingjay – Part 1 felt pointless as there was no need to turn it into two films (I gave it 7/10). Part 2 is at least a bit better than Part 1 since you finally get a conclusion instead of being left hanging halfway through a story. I once again enjoyed re-visiting these characters & stand by my opinion that Jennifer Lawrence was the perfect choice to play Katniss (although the hubby thought she seemed bored in these last two films, which I don’t totally agree with but do admit that it did feel that way a little at times).

Elizabeth Banks & Woody Harrelson have very small roles in this final film, which is a shame as they’re two great characters. The character of Peeta is once again a bit of a bore (sorry if you like him! but his character is a bit bland). One big complaint I’ve had all along & still have is that I don’t think they developed the character of Primrose (sister of Katniss) enough. Well, the books were kind of guilty of this as well if I remember correctly but they should have given more screen time to the two sisters and slightly less to the somewhat annoying love triangle. I don’t think the films fully gave you the sense of love that Katniss has for her sister and also felt they didn’t fully explain some important plot points to a movie audience that hasn’t read the books. I think I’d have been slightly lost during the two Mockingjay films if I hadn’t read the books.


I really want to hear from you guys what you all thought of this one & whether or not you’ve read the books. I’ve not yet read any other reviews so don’t know what kind of reaction this movie is getting but I’d guess that those who haven’t read the books will feel the way that my hubby did & won’t really like this film. As I said, I can’t really fault this movie as it’s a good adaptation and I think they’ve done a pretty great job in choosing the cast for this entire series (especially Lawrence). Mockingjay – Part 2 is a good film but I kind of lost interest in it in the same way I did with the final book. Obviously you’ll want to see it if you’ve watched all the others but don’t expect it to be much different than Part 1. However you felt about Part 1, you’ll probably feel the same about Part 2

Sorry for that rather uninformative review! It’s a very hard one to talk about without spoiling things so feel free to discuss it with me further in the comments. :-) Just try to put a spoiler warning at the start.

My Rating: 7/10

Music Video Friday: Soul Asylum – Runaway Train

This week’s music video is Runaway Train by Soul Asylum.

I’m sure people remember this video well as it showed photos of actual missing teenagers (mostly runaways). I remember being quite fascinated (and upset) by this video at the time & I often wondered if any of the kids featured in the video had been found.

I hadn’t thought of the video in years until I started doing this Music Video Friday thing. After thinking of doing this one, it suddenly occurred to me that I’d now be able to easily Google it & find out if it really helped to find any of the missing teens. Not all the stories have happy endings, unfortunately, but the video’s director (Tony Kaye) claims that 26 of those featured were found. I think that’s fantastic.

Wikipedia has the most information that I could find (link HERE):

“There were three original versions of the video in the United States, totaling 36 missing children shown. Depending on what country the video was being broadcast, they would show children from that area who are missing. The version shown in Australia showed a number of young backpacking tourists whose families were looking for them. Several of them turned out to be victims of Ivan Milat, the Backpacker Murderer.

The UK version of the video featured Vicky Hamilton and Dinah McNicol, who each went missing in 1991. Their remains were found in 2007 at a house in Margate. Peter Tobin has since been convicted of both murders.

Curtis Huntzinger, who was featured in the US video, was located deceased in 2008. His convicted killer, Stephen Daniel Hash, is currently serving a sentence of 11 years for manslaughter in Folsom State Prison.

The last image in all three U.S. versions of the song is Thomas Dean Gibson, who disappeared from Glendale, Oregon, in 1991 at the age of 2. He is still missing as of 2014, and age-progressed photos of him at age 19 and age 21 were released in 2009 and 2012, respectively, by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. His father, Larry Gibson, a former deputy sheriff, was convicted of second degree manslaughter for accidentally shooting his son to death when he shot at a stray cat in his front yard even though no remains were ever found. He steadfastly denies killing his son and has worked on finding him since being released from prison in 1996.”

I also read in a couple of articles that the band would sometimes be approached by people who had been in the video & they weren’t all happy at having been found, as some had run away from bad situations at home. However, despite the sad stories (which are the only ones that are focused on in what I’ve been able to find), there were still 26 teenagers who were reunited with their families & I think the director and the band did the video with the right intentions. It’s great that a music video was used for a good cause instead of once again just featuring scantily clad women.

(But man I hate 90’s music like this, which I already had a rant about when I posted Blind Melon’s No Rain…). ;-) But I always appreciate a good video, whether or not I like the song. 

Here’s one version of the video:

My Top Ten Ryan Gosling Movies

Happy Birthday to Ryan Gosling, who turns 35 today! :-)

Sorry, Ryan Gosling – I’ve totally gone off you. Wait… That sounded rude. It was a bit like “Happy Birthday! I hate you.” ;-)

No, I don’t hate Ryan Gosling – I was a big fan of his for a little while back in his Drive days (waaaay back in 2011). I even started a little Ryan Gosling Project where I was going to attempt to watch every film he’s been in. Well, I didn’t get very far with that. I got bored and, after the horrible reviews for Only God Forgives (which I still haven’t seen), I kind of abandoned the project before I’d even started it.

I do think Gosling has displayed some pretty good acting skills in some of the lesser known films below, such as Half Nelson, so it’s a shame that not many people will have seen him in things beyond The Notebook & Drive. I’d really like to see him in a good movie again soon because, when a role is right for him, I think he does a good job & has a charisma about him that not all actors have.

So here are My Top Ten Ryan Gosling Movies (ranked by movie, not performance) counting down to my favorite:

10. Murder By Numbers

9. The Ides Of March

8. Crazy, Stupid, Love.

7. The Notebook

6. All Good Things

5. Half Nelson

4. The Place Beyond The Pines

3. Blue Valentine

2. Drive

1. Lars And The Real Girl

**FYI – I don’t even remember Murder By Numbers so maybe that would rank higher on a re-watch. As for The Notebook, it’s an extremely flawed film that makes me want to gag half the time. But, screw it – kissing in the rain is sexy.

The Films I’ve Not Seen (there aren’t a lot – maybe I should attempt my Ryan Gosling Project again):

Frankenstein And Me
The Unbelievables
Remember The Titans
The Believer
The Slaughter Rule
The United States Of Leland
Gangster Squad
Only God Forgives

Suffragette (2015) Review

Suffragette (2015)

Directed by Sarah Gavron

Starring: Carey Mulligan, Helena Bonham Carter, Brendan Gleeson, Anne-Marie Duff, Ben Whishaw, Meryl Streep

Plot Synopsis: (via IMDB)
The foot soldiers of the early feminist movement, women who were forced underground to pursue a dangerous game of cat and mouse with an increasingly brutal State.

My Opinion:

I went to a movie with the hubby the other day and I really needed to go to one since I hadn’t been to one in months and I was having major withdrawal. There weren’t a lot to choose from (I’m not really a Bond fan and The Peanuts Movie doesn’t come out in the UK until the end of December. Grr!! I’m not happy about that!). Anyway, I fully admit that I don’t often feel like watching a “heavy” film but Suffragette was the only thing showing at a time that worked out for us. 

Well, I’m glad I saw it because I thought it was really good. I’m quite sure it will end up in my Top Ten Movies Of 2015 when I make the final list. I’ve seen some “meh” reviews of it on the blogs here but I didn’t feel that way about it at all.

I’ll also admit this right now: I’ve never had much of an interest in “history”. I can understand why some people do but it was always one of my least favorite subjects in school and you’re unlikely to find me ever watching the History Channel. The past is the past – I’m more interested in the present and the future. So I of course knew of the Suffragettes although I didn’t know a lot of specifics. I definitely have even more of an appreciation for what these women did after seeing this movie, though, which to me should be the point of movies about important historical events.

I’m aware that Carey Mulligan’s character and story are fictional & I think that may be part of the reason why this movie isn’t being praised quite as much as historical dramas which are based on completely true stories. I have no issues with some fictional characters, though, as long as the story is told well. Mulligan’s character is an amalgamation of the many nameless women who, at great personal cost, fought for something they believed in.

Would I have been a Suffragette? Would I have dared to speak up at a time when a woman questioning things as simple as why she wasn’t allowed to vote yet was expected to follow the law or why she got less pay than a man doing the exact same job could lead to a beating by police, time in prison, torture if she chose to go on a hunger strike, and the possibility that employers, friends & loved ones (both male & female) would turn their backs on her just for questioning these very basic rights that we take for granted nowadays? No – I wouldn’t have been a Suffragette. I’m the type who doesn’t even speak up for herself now in 2015 so I have a tremendous amount of respect for these women who did so at at time when it was downright dangerous to ask for equality. These are the women who young girls should be looking up to (I discussed the basics of this movie with my own daughter after watching it). It breaks my heart that more girls know the names of each useless Kardashi-thingy than a name like Emmeline Pankhurst.

I’m not going to act like I knew much, though, as I already said that I never had much of an interest in history. So while I knew about Pankhurst, I’ll admit that I knew nothing about the other real-life female character in this movie (Emily Wilding Davison). Hubby had a good giggle when he leaned over & said “you’re the only person in this cinema who doesn’t know what’s about to happen, aren’t you?” when her big moment came. Yep! What can I say? I got a typical 80’s American history education. ;-)

So as a movie-blogger and not a history-blogger, I have to say that I thought the actresses in Suffragette were all fantastic. Streep plays Pankhurst but it’s an even smaller role than I was expecting (I think she had no more than ten minutes of screen time). She was, of course, her usual Streep-y self. She’s always great & I also love her in real life. She’s feisty! She’s always speaking out about her beliefs so it’s no surprise that she would play someone like Pankhurst. The same goes for Helena Bonham Carter, who plays the exact sort of character you’d expect in Suffragette. I’ve never considered myself a fan of hers but the truth is that she’s an excellent actress and another one that I have respect for in real life (she’s a feisty one too – I probably like strong, feisty women because I’m such a pushover myself).

Finally, the characters played by both Anne-Marie Duff & Carey Mulligan were based on the many working class Suffragettes who found it very hard to fight for a cause while also trying just to survive & make a living for their families. Both actresses were fantastic and I was happy to see Mulligan in a great role again. I was such a big fan of hers after that Doctor Who episode Blink but then she seemed to play the same characters over & over (her excruciatingly dull Daisy in The Great Gatsby drove me nuts, but that may be more the fault of how that character was written). 

I suppose I especially liked Mulligan in this as I could relate to her character, who kind of inadvertently gets involved in a cause she’s not sure she wants to be a part of due to the ramifications and the fact that she has a son she loves & has to take care of. We know about the more public figures such as Pankhurst but it’s hard to imagine the sacrifices these working class women made, especially when even a peaceful protest could land them in jail for days, hurting the family who depended on their meager wages. Mulligan may be one of the fictional characters but she felt the most “real” to me. Bravery isn’t always bold & brash – as much as I’d love to be an educated & ass-kicking character like Bonham Carter’s, there are more women in this world who are like Mulligan’s character & I’d be happy to see her understated performance get an Oscar nomination.

I did do a tiny bit of reading about the real women after watching Suffragette (this is a really good article about some of the real women who inspired the characters in the movie:

My favorite story is that Helena Bonham Carter’s character is a combination of a husband & wife team who fought for women to get the vote (Barbara Ayrton Gould and her husband Gerald) and a woman who knew martial arts & taught the Suffragettes jiu-jitsu to defend themselves and to protect the leaders of the movement (which became known as “suffrajitsu” according to the above article. I love that!). This woman was named Edith Garrud and Bonham Carter was inspired by her & had her character named Edith in her honor. I want to learn suffrajitsu! That’s awesome. :-)

Have a look at the above article if, like me, you’re not much of a history buff. I know I really should do more reading about the real-life Suffrage movement as I do find women’s rights throughout history to be quite fascinating (mainly due to the fact that I find it just plain confusing why all human beings, to this day, still aren’t all treated equally). The film ends with statistics showing the years in which women earned the right to vote in various countries and it’s shocking just how recent a lot of those dates were (never mind the places where they still aren’t allowed to vote even now). As far as this movie goes, I think it does its job in bringing attention to a still important topic as, to me, Suffragette is just as much about everyone’s basic human rights as it is about women being able to vote. I know not everyone loved it but this movie gets my vote.

My Rating: 8/10

Into The Wild (2007) IMDB Top 250 Guest Review

Today’s IMDB Top 250 Guest Review comes from Melissa of Snap Crackle Watch!. Thanks for the review, Melissa! :-) Now let’s see what she thought of Into The Wild, IMDB rank 161 out of 250…

There are still some movies up for grabs if anyone wants to do a guest IMDB Top 250 review. You can find the list of remaining films HERE. See the full list & links to all the reviews that have already been done HERE. Also, if you’d like to add a link to your IMDB review(s) on your own blogs, feel free to use any of the logos I’ve used at the top of any of these guest reviews.

Into the Wild (2007)

Directed by Sean Penn

Written by Sean Penn

Into the Wild (2007), written and directed by Sean Penn, adapted from the book by the same name by Jon Krakauer is a perspective into the life of Christopher McCandless (Emile Hirsch). The young man who went into the wilderness of Alaska in search of himself and to shed his city life and roots.

Many people who live privileged lives, ones that are untouched by grief, poverty, never know the reality of struggling day by day. I believe that what McCandless sought was that feeling and that experience of the unknown. When a young person grows up stressed and under pressure by daily life, they don’t know how they will make it another day. All they know is that they have to and one day there may be a better day for them. But growing up he never really had to face any of those moments.

It was only till he got older that he would see that his family was nothing near perfect and that the challenges he put on himself would prove to be a dangerous route. This is one of those stories that touches the viewer to the bone, it’s emotional, exciting and makes you wonder what kind of person what put themselves through this journey.

Abandoning a trust fund, his car, and any material possessions other than those he could carry on his back, McCandless sets out on a passage to reach the Stampede Trail in Alaska. He doesn’t contact his parents, Walt (William Hurt) and Billie MCandless (Marcia Gay Harden), nor does he even contact his sister Carine (Jena Malone) who he was close with growing up. We only see his family in flashbacks, as the movie hints at his past, we see that his parents did not live that idyllic life that maybe he thought existed, but instead had a lot of deep secrets that the family kept hidden.

Throughout his journey, McCandless meets various people on the road. They teach him lessons about life and about forging relationships. Through them he begins to see that there are so many different varied people out there in the world. With traveling hippies Jan (Catherine Keener) and Rainey (Brian H. Dierker) he learns about marriage and what it takes to keep that spirit alive. He works with Wayne (Vince Vaughn) for a while, who he observes as a friendly farmer who gives him a chance to work and earn some money.

Later on he meets Ron Franz (Hal Holbrook) the two enter into an endearing relationship, he teaches him how to do leatherwork and ends up giving him his old camping supplies. It was as if the older man could see himself maybe in McCandless or maybe he enjoyed hearing his idealistic visions about his upcoming adventure. Regardless, he touched everyone he met as much as he appreciated them.

Once McCandless enters into the wilderness, he finds an old school bus that he sets up camp in, it becomes his home in the end. We see his adventures take off, running through the woods and streams, and even killing a moose. It’s as if he envisioned himself as a romanticized version of Jack London himself, getting into adventures and journaling them as an idealistic writer. Everything changes for him in Alaska and his life is turned upside down. The choices he made carry them with him till the end and we see them play out in front of us.

Penn captures the essence of adventure and defeat in this film. It is obvious that he put his heart and soul into the film, as it took two years to make. The soundtrack by Eddie Veder goes perfectly with the sentiments of the film and makes you feel that foreboding loneliness with each scene.

Hirsch was amazing and deserved every accolade for his portrayal of McCandless. This definitely solidified him as a great actor; he carried the entire movie on his back.

I absolutely loved this movie, I enjoy movies that make me think about life and allow me to be introspective. McCandless isn’t shown as a martyr, which I think is important, instead he was simply a young man who wanted to have his own adventures and make something of his life on his own terms, nothing more than that. Overall great film, it is one I could re-watch and probably still garner some nugget of wisdom from each time.


Transmissions: Lonely Robot Paintings By Matt Dixon

Illustrator Matt Dixon has created this absolutely adorable series of lonely-looking robots entitled Transmissions. You can read more about him & how he creates these paintings plus see more of his fabulous work here: Bored Panda.

I adore these paintings so much. What is it with me & cute robots?? When asked recently who my favorite Star Wars character was, I barely even gave the human characters a thought. My answer was, of course, R2-D2. And I’ve never been more excited about a Pixar movie than when I saw all the teasers for WALL-E. I made a special trip into London to see it the day it came out & immediately fell in love with that little trash compactor with the big heart. It instantly became one of my all-time favorite films (not just favorite “animated” film). 

I could go on about my favorite robots all day (I suppose I should finish that top ten list that’s been sitting in my Drafts for years… I think I’m waiting for when I finally watch Metropolis! I’m such a procrastinator). It’s hard to pick a favorite painting of Dixon’s but I’d probably go with that first one with the kite. Aww – someone help him untangle his kite! I also love the one below, which has a great Iron Giant/Laputan robot (from Studio Ghibli’s Castle In The Sky) feel about it. Amazing. I think these are beautiful. It’s impossible to look at these paintings & not smile. Thank you, Matt Dixon! :-)

Weird Science Star Ilan Mitchell-Smith Talks Babes, Bullies, And Bras, 30 Years Later

Ilan Mitchell-Smith was definitely one of my nerd-crushes when I first watched Weird Science. Who doesn’t love a cute nerd? He was the type of boy you could imagine actually dating, unlike some hot Chris Hemsworth-type. Give me the cute nerd instead! (Well, okay – I wouldn’t say no to Chris Hemsworth). ;-)

You can read an interview with the now 46-year-old professor of medieval studies here: Uproxx. And you can read the review I did of the movie with Eric of The IPC for my big John Hughes Blogathon here: Weird Science Double Take. And here’s Ilan Mitchell-Smith now. He’s still quite nerdy-cute!

Taking It Easy On The Blogging:

I’ll be sharing these sort of movie “tidbits” a bit more often again as I’m needing a small blogging break. The IMDB guest reviews have dried up (after this coming Tuesday) and I don’t want to commit to any sort of regular schedule for anything. My main priorities will be reviewing current movies that I go to in the cinema & my top ten lists but I may not do them every week. We’ll see! I just want the blog to take more of a backseat to other things in my life. I’ll read other blogs when I’m able to but my rule to keep life simple is this: as long as a post is still in the app’s Reader when I have time to do some reading, I’ll read it. My Reader shows about a day & a half worth of posts from blogs that I follow. But I’ll do my best to keep up with what’s in the Reader and hopefully won’t miss too many posts from my favorite blogs. :-) 

So the schedule I’m going to half-heartedly follow through Christmas is this:

Mondays & WednesdaysRandom news about things I like, such as today’s post, and movie or book reviews when I have time to do them. 

Tuesdays: IMDB reviews from guests if I receive any or from myself if I can be arsed. I can’t be arsed lately. ;-) But I’ve watched & not yet reviewed quite a few so I should attempt some! 

Thursdays: Top Ten lists. I’ll stay fairly regular with this as I have tons of ideas ready but may skip some weeks if time is short. 

Fridays: Music Video Friday. I’m keeping this up even though no one looks at these posts because a) I enjoy these posts and admit that I’m selfishly doing them for my own amusement and b) they’re super quick & easy to put together! Which is cool as I’m totally lazy. 

Sorry – this isn’t some trying-to-get-attention thing… I’m just explaining that my appearance on the blogs may be somewhat sporadic. I’m trying to achieve the right balance with real life. But I’ve realized, finally, that this blog is a part of my life now so I’m cutting back a little to keep me actually enjoying doing it. If that makes sense. Oh, I never make sense anyway. 

Here’s Oingo Boingo! :-) That’s a good band name. Shit, I think I forgot to include that in My Top Ten Band Names… (I’m more annoyed that I forgot Scritti Politti):

Music Video Friday: Sigala – Easy Love

This week’s music video is the super catchy, Jackson 5 sampling Easy Love by Sigala.

First of all, I like this song because who doesn’t like ABC by The Jackson 5? People with no souls, that’s who! It’s a brilliant song & I love how it’s used in Easy Love. But I want to talk more about the video…

My six-year-old is very interested in music and, lately, has been watching more & more music videos. Which is great! However, I hate how so many of them are completely inappropriate. The biggest problem is how often music videos contain very scantily clad women setting very bad examples for young girls. I’d have to say that my husband gets even more angry at this than I do. After one video in which a very pretty model-type did nothing but stand around looking all pouty & sexy, my hubby told our daughter that the girl is probably a scientist trying to find a cure for cancer but sometimes, for fun, she likes to put on pretty clothes & dance. (The video was How Deep Is Your Love by Calvin Harris. Good song & certainly not the most offensive video ever – just a bit pointless. It’s not like it’s Blurred Lines. Don’t even get me started on that…).

Anyway, what a relief it was when I first saw the cute & very kid-friendly Sigala video. It was also nice to not have to hastily turn the channel for a change! The video features two kids who go around the city having “dance offs” with various other groups of kids.

Here’s a bit of info from Wikipedia:

Shot in Los Angeles, the video features the Canadian/Filipino dancing duo Lucky Aces, whose appearance on The Ellen DeGeneres Show caught the attention of the video’s producer, who cast the act in the video.

And here’s the video. It makes me smile. :-)

My Top Ten Sam Rockwell Movies

Happy Birthday to Sam Rockwell, who turns 47 today!

I know there are quite a few Sam Rockwell fans but I never really paid much attention to him until The Way Way Back. I thought he was fantastic in that movie & his character is probably one of my very favorites of the last few years. He’s made some odd choices when it comes to some of his movie roles and I’ll admit now that I only really like the top four on this list. Now that Sam Rockwell has finally grown on me, I should re-watch some of his older films (like Confessions Of A Dangerous Mind, which I know I liked at the time but sure as shit can’t remember now). It feels like he still needs that one perfect movie & role to finally get him the recognition I think he probably deserves by now.

But he’s really screwed me over this year for Luke’s Fantasy Acting League over at Oracle Of Film as he had several movies listed as 2015 on IMDB that never got full releases! What gives, Sam Rockwell?! You’ve lost me loads of points! ;-)

Here are My Top Ten Sam Rockwell Movies counting down to the four I actually really like as he’s had some dodgy films that have squeaked into this list to make it to ten (FYI – I always rank these lists according to how much I like the movie, not the actor’s individual role):

10. Charlie’s Angels

9. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

8. Confessions Of A Dangerous Mind

7. Choke

6. Matchstick Men

5. Galaxy Quest

4. Seven Psychopaths

3. Moon

2. The Green Mile

1. The Way Way Back

FYI – these are the only two other Sam Rockwell movies that I’ve seen & they really could be interchangeable with 9th & 10th place:

– Iron Man 2
– The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy

Seven Psychopaths (2012) Review

Seven Psychopaths (2012)

Directed & Written by Martin McDonagh

Starring: Colin Farrell, Sam Rockwell, Woody Harrelson, Christopher Walken, Tom Waits, Abbie Cornish, Olga Kurylenko, Željko Ivanek

Plot Synopsis: (via IMDB)
A struggling screenwriter inadvertently becomes entangled in the Los Angeles criminal underworld after his oddball friends kidnap a gangster’s beloved Shih Tzu.

My Opinion:

I’d been meaning to watch this movie for a while as I really liked Martin McDonagh’s In Bruges. Unfortunately, I ended up being a little disappointed as Seven Psychopaths is definitely not as good as In Bruges. There are several fantastic moments, though, and some great performances from the impressive cast. In fact, I’d say there are a few moments of pure brilliance & I’ll be sure to discuss the movie’s positives as well as the negatives. But, overall, I thought the main plot was a bit of a mess and far too convoluted.

In this movie, Colin Farrell’s character is a writer working on a screenplay called Seven Psychopaths. He hasn’t gotten very far with the script (I think he’d only managed to think up one out of the seven psychopaths if I remember correctly) so his friend (a dognapper played by Sam Rockwell) tries to help him out with the other six. Meanwhile, Rockwell (who kidnaps dogs for “boss” Christopher Walken) has managed to anger a real-life psychopath (Woody Harrelson) after kidnapping his beloved dog.

What’s unfortunate is that this overall dognapping story is the main part of the plot yet it’s the weakest thing about the movie. The main story is messy & feels too forced. Okay – part of this may somewhat be down to my dislike of Woody Harrelson. Aside from his “dumb guy” character in Cheers, I’ve never liked him in anything else. He just seemed very weak next to the likes of Walken and even Rockwell (who was fantastic in this). Colin Farrell was just his usual Colin Farrell self (I’m not a big fan of his either but he’s fine in this although his role could have been played by anyone).

The interesting thing about this movie, which I didn’t know beforehand, is that there are several other stories that get told throughout the film as ideas for further psychopathic characters are discussed. We witness these stories (such as the one with Tom Waits in the above photo) and, DAMN, these stories are good! I’d watch full movies of a few of these stories as they’re all far more interesting than the overall plot involving the dognapping & Woody Harrelson’s character. It reminded me a lot of Grindhouse & how the fake trailers looked so good that they ended up making movies of some of them (I didn’t watch Machete so I don’t know if that was any good but I really enjoyed Hobo With A Shotgun).

As well as these “stories within a story”, which I liked a hell of a lot, I really loved Christopher Walken & Sam Rockwell. I like Christopher Walken but he can be a little strange sometimes. I complained about him “phoning it in” in my review of Things To Do In Denver When You’re Dead. He plays the same sort of character far too often but, although he’s playing that sort of character once again here, he gives such a perfect performance. His final scene is especially awesome as were the scenes with his character’s wife (played by a woman named Linda Bright Clay, who appears to have been in very little else. Why?! She’s fantastic in this! Another one of this movie’s highlights). Walken’s & Clay’s characters were both fantastic, as was their story. Well done to McDonagh on writing their parts. 

Sam Rockwell was possibly the main highlight for me, though. At least, as far as the acting was concerned – my favorite thing was definitely the “stories within a story”. I have a post about Rockwell scheduled for tomorrow & I say the same thing that I’ll say now: I don’t think he’s really lucked out quite yet in getting that one “perfect role”. When he does, I think he’ll finally get the attention he deserves. This is definitely a defining role for him, however, and probably my second favorite performance of his. I’m starting to kind of finally see the reason he seems to have some pretty loyal fans. If you’re a fan of his but haven’t seen this movie for some reason, I highly recommend that you check it out. 


Seven Psychopaths is an odd one. It’s so good at times and just plain confusing at other times. I’m afraid that it tries a little too hard to be cool. I think it wants to be like something made by Tarantino but, although the clever dialogue is there and there are some very rich characters, the story is even more convoluted than that in Pulp Fiction. I’m struggling with rating this one as I think it deserves a higher score than I’ll probably give it but I can’t ignore the fact that the main plot really didn’t hold my interest at all. But I’m in no way trying to talk people out of watching this one as I think parts of it are brilliant and the writing is far better than we get from most movies. I’d actually recommend this one as I think a lot of people reading this would like this movie quite a lot. If you like In Bruges or Things To Do In Denver When You’re Dead or anything from Tarantino, you’ll definitely like this one as well. I guess I’d rather have a few moments of brilliance than a movie that’s mediocre the whole way through.

My Rating: 7/10

Mystic River (2003) IMDB Top 250 Guest Review

Today’s IMDB Top 250 Guest Review comes from Khalid of The Blazing Reel. Thanks for the review, Khalid! :-) Now let’s see what he has to say about Mystic River, IMDB rank 239 out of 250…

There are still some movies up for grabs if anyone wants to do a guest IMDB Top 250 review. You can find the list of remaining films HERE. See the full list & links to all the reviews that have already been done HERE. Also, if you’d like to add a link to your IMDB review(s) on your own blogs, feel free to use any of the logos I’ve used at the top of any of these guest reviews.

Very few people in Hollywood have had a career quite like that of Clint Eastwood. In a career that’s spanned over forty years, ol’ Clint has done it all; he’s starred in some of the greatest movies to come out during this time-period, played some of the most memorable on-screen characters, heck, the guy is basically the poster boy for badassery. He’s also one of the few actors who’ve made even better directors. But of all the Unforgivens and Million Dollar Babies, there’s one film that’s for me, stands out as the crowning achievement on his truly stellar career. That film is of course Mystic River.

Mystic River The Blazing Reel Top 25 Movies of All Time Sean Penn Clint Eastwood Kevin Bacon Tim Robbins

When the daughter of ex-con Jimmy Markum (Sean Penn) is murdered, two of his childhood friends from the neighborhood are involved. Dave Boyle (Tim Robbins), a blue-collar worker, was the last person to see her alive, while Sean Devine (Kevin Bacon), a homicide detective, is heading up the case. As Sean proceeds with his investigation, Jimmy conducts one of his own through neighborhood contacts, soon Jimmy and Sean both start to suspect their old pal, Dave, who lives a quiet life with his wife Celeste (Marcia Gay Harden) but harbors some disturbing secrets.

Dark, ominous and brooding to a fault, Mystic River is quite simply one of the greatest dramas to ever hit the screen. It’s a film that got unfairly swept under the rug when out came out twelve years ago mainly because of the buzz surrounding its two Oscar competitors, Return of the King and Lost in Translation. But while they were both great films, it’s Mystic River that stands out as the most emotionally resonant of the three.

Benefitting from some truly magnificent work by Clint Eastwood, screenwriter Brian Helgeland and an ensemble cast, firing on all cylinders, Mystic River had my attention from the very first scene and proceeded to engage me even more. Brian Helgeland ‘s brilliant script, adapted from the book by Dennis Lehane never loses focus of a story that may seem pretty conventional on paper, rather keeps surprising us with twists and turns that enhance the drama only more.

Mystic River Tim Robbins

And you can’t ask for a better display of acting than the one you get from this film and Sean Penn and Tim Robbins, both of whom seem to lose themselves in their roles, carry the movie with their mesmerising, Oscar winning performances. Many people were shocked when Penn beat out Bill Murray at the Oscars that year but while it’s debatable which performance of the two was better, no one can say that his performance wasn’t worthy of merit because as Jimmy Markum, Penn gives a complex, riveting and groundbreaking performance and despite that Tim Robbins -who’s equally brilliant, if not more- is able to steal so many scenes from him in his haunting turn as Dave Boyle.

Not to forget, Kevin Bacon, Laurence Fishburne and Marcia Gay Harden who provide great support as well. But ultimately though, it’s the film’s powerful emotional core that makes it such an unforgettable experience and the reason why I keep revisiting after all these years. The film has a very unique moral conscience and an exceedingly dense plot that sets it apart from most dramas and its stark depiction of tragedy and loss is perhaps one of the most compelling ones ever put on film.

Black And White Icons Inspired By Studio Ghibli Films

I saw these in the middle of October but was sticking to horror-only posts. It’s Studio Ghibli, though, so I had to share! 

These are from graphic designer HWAL & you can see the Studio Ghibli Icons Collection here: Behance. I want this below design as wallpaper! How awesome would a Ghibli bedroom be for a kid?! (Okay, or for me…) ;-)

Ghostbusters, The Lost Boys & Amazing Stories News

Happy Halloween! I thought I’d share a few tidbits about three (of many!) things I loved in the Eighties: The Lost Boys, Amazing Stories & Ghostbusters.

First up is some fun Ghostbusters artwork. There was an art show in Los Angeles last night called “No Ghost Logos” in which artists paid tribute to the Ghostbusters logo creator, Michael C. Gross. Each artist did their own take on the Ghostbusters logo. You can check some of them out here: GeekTyrant.

Next is an interesting article I read about my all-time favorite vampire movie: The Lost Boys. You can read the article, “How The Lost Boys made vampires sexy way before Buffy or Twilight” here: gamesradar.

Finally, I just read some news that I’m very excited about! I absolutely loved Steven Spielberg’s TV series Amazing Stories and wish it had run much longer than it did. Luckily, it looks like it’s being revived all these years later by Bryan Fuller. Fuller is responsible for shows such as Dead Like Me, Pushing Daisies, and Hannibal. Well, damn – I’ve not watched any of those shows. Also, Spielberg won’t be involved with this new Amazing Stories series. Hmm. Okay, I’m still excited although I really don’t know what to expect. (You can read the Geek Tyrant article about it HERE).

Amazing Stories was a collection of odd & often supernatural stories each week and while some weren’t great, the good ones were fantastic. The episodes had very big name stars and it looks like pretty much all of them are available to be watched in full on YouTube. Three that I’d recommend are The Mission starring Kevin Costner & Lost Boy Kiefer Sutherland (this is probably the most famous episode – watch it HERE) and a war one called No Day At The Beach starring Charlie Sheen (HERE) and a cute Halloween-y one called Mummy, Daddy (HERE).

Being the age I am, however, my personal favorite was Head Of The Class directed by Robert Zemeckis and starring Christopher Lloyd, Mary Stuart Masterson & Scott Coffey (after which the two young stars were also together in a John Hughes favorite of mine: Some Kind Of Wonderful). It’s another one that’s perfect for Halloween! Here’s the IMDB plot synopsis:

In this hour-long episode, a teenage horror buff (Coffey) is so smitten with a sexy classmate (Masterson) that he helps her use black magic on their loathsome English teacher, with shocking and bewildering results.

Here it is. Love it!: :-)

Happy Halloween! My Horror Month Roundup

Happy Halloween, everyone! :-) I hope you have some special plans for tonight. Don’t eat too much candy!

Well, my month of horror is finished. I usually enjoy it but this year was a struggle as, unfortunately, I accidentally watched a lot of really bad horror movies! I did enjoy a few, however. I figured I’d do a little summary today with links to all my October horror-related posts.

First up are the 16 horror movies that I watched & reviewed. I’ve ranked them from best to worst & have included my rating:

1. Dead Of Night – 7.5/10

2. M – 7.5/10

3. Waxwork – 7.5/10

4. What We Do In The Shadows – 7.5/10

5. Horns – 6.5/10

6. Shivers – 6.5/10

7. Rabid – 6/10

8. Dead Snow 2: Red Vs Dead – 6/10

9. The Crazies – 6/10

10. The Sacrament – 5.5/10

11. Class Of Nuke ‘Em High – 5/10

12. Let’s Scare Jessica To Death – 5/10

13. Mama – 4.5/10

14. The Quiet Ones – 4/10

15. Repo! The Genetic Opera – 3/10

16. The Victim – 1.5/10

I also did a really fun review for Channel: Superhero‘s Tales From The Crypt Blogathon. The episode starred Steve Buscemi & Roger Daltrey and was super gross! But I enjoyed squeezing as many song titles & lyrics by The Who as possible into the post… :-)

Tales From The Crypt – Forever Ambergris – 6.5/10

I also kept up my usual Thursday Top Ten lists, but all had a horror theme this month. Here are my Top Ten Horror Lists:

My Top Ten Horror Movie Quotes

My Top Ten Devil & Hell Songs

My Top Ten Body Horror Movies

My Top Ten Horror Comedies

My Top Ten Nightmare On Elm Street Deaths

Finally, I did a few reblogs. Two classics, two modern-day films that I really enjoyed, and one example of a body horror film in conjunction with my above Top Ten Body Horror Movies list. Here are my Horror Reblogs:

The Cabinet Of Dr Caligari

Nosferatu (1922)

The Babadook

It Follows

From Beyond

That’s it! Now it’s on to November, when I can go back to watching & reviewing normal movies again. Yay! (Although I did just watch another horror movie last night: John Carpenter’s Prince Of Darkness. Hmm. Not sure about that one…).

Have a bloody good Halloween, people! :-)

The Babadook (2014) Review


Happy Halloween tomorrow, everyone! :-)

As I said earlier in the week, I had family visiting so only managed to write a few new posts for this week. Today I figured I’d just reblog my review of my absolute favorite horror film of, oh, probably the last ten years? (Since the Dawn Of The Dead remake was 11 years ago – nothing else since the year 2000 beats that one. Love it!). So here’s my review of the fantastic psychological horror film The Babadook…

Originally posted on Cinema Parrot Disco:


The Babadook (2014)

Directed by Jennifer Kent

Essie Davis
Noah Wiseman
Daniel Henshall
Hayley McElhinney
Barbara West
Ben Winspear

Running time: 94 minutes

Plot Synopsis: (via IMDB)
A single mother, plagued by the violent death of her husband, battles with her son’s fear of a monster lurking in the house, but soon discovers a sinister presence all around her.


My Opinion:

Last year I was pretty positive in my review of The Conjuring mostly, I think, because I was SO desperate for a good horror movie to ever actually be made again and that one was about the closest we’ve had to a decent American horror movie in years. It wasn’t perfect but at least it was almost a return to the good ‘ol days of horror movies that didn’t rely solely on cheap jump scares and/or excessive gore. Well, The Babadook is more the sort…

View original 674 more words

My Top Ten Nightmare On Elm Street Deaths

I’ve always loved the Nightmare On Elm Street films although I’ve never been in love with bloody slasher flicks. Give me a creepy psychological or supernatural “horror” instead and I’m happy. I liked a few slashers in the fake-looking gore of my beloved Eighties but I stay the hell away from gory modern day films. Gross. There was something about the Elm Street series, though, that I found fascinating from the first time I saw the first film at a party at the age of 13. Dream Warriors was my second Elm Street movie a year or so later and remains my most-watched as I recorded it off of TV & played it over & over again. I eventually watched the rest but, let’s face it, those two are by FAR the best. 

Admittedly, this top ten list is very heavy on Elm Steet 1 & 3 as those are the most special to me. And as with all my lists, this is my own personal top ten so I’m sure some won’t agree with all my choices. For the record, I’ve not included any Freddy “deaths”, only those of his victims. So here are My Top Ten Nightmare On Elm Street Deaths:

**SPOILERS (obviously)**

10. Ceiling Death: Part II

Victim: Julie Peyton McKenna in Wes Craven’s New Nightmare

This one probably deserves to be a bit higher but I’ve not watched New Nightmare since the night I went to it when it came out in 1994. It deserves a mention, though, for re-creating one of the original film’s most iconic scenes. 

9. Waterbed Death

Victim: Joey Crusel in A Nightmare On Elm Street 4: The Dream Master

It was only a matter of time before a waterbed was used in an Elm Street death scene! Waterbeds were weird things… Has anyone here ever had one?? Anyway, the water turning red with blood was pretty effective. And there were boobs in this scene, too! 

8. Video Game Death

Victim: Spencer Lewis in Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmare

I know this might not make most lists. It’s indeed one of the more “cheesy” kills but, hey – at least I’ve not included the roach motel kill! I also admit to having a soft spot for Freddy’s Dead as it’s the first Elm Street film I was able to go & see and I had a fun time seeing it with a couple of friends. And… Breckin Meyer! Someone who actually went on to do some non-horror stuff after being in a horror film! 

7. Impaled On Car’s Tail Fin Death

Victim: Donald Thompson in A Nightmare On Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors

This is the first of two Elm Street deaths that upset me. Well, upset is a strong word… Anyway, I was still young when I first watched this & I think I somehow thought that heroes from the first film would somehow survive (I’d clearly not yet watched enough slashers). This death ties in with the more obvious one that’ll be higher on the list. And… John Saxon! Did this dude love being in movies or WHAT?! (IMDB lists him as being in 201 things. Way to go, John Saxon!)

6. Television Death

Victim: Jennifer Caulfield in A Nightmare On Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors

Another cheesy but fun death and one of my favorite Elm Street lines: “Welcome to prime time, bitch!”

5. Comic Book Death

Victim: Marcus “Mark” Gray in A Nightmare On Elm Street 5: The Dream Child

Do people like this one? I have no idea but I always loved it. It also lacks gore, which is nice for a wuss like me. I suppose it totally rips off A-ha’s Take On Me video but, oh well – that video rules. 

4. Cruel Trick By Freddy Death

Victim: Nancy Thompson in A Nightmare On Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors

This one made me so mad. How could they kill off Nancy?! And to have Freddy pretend to be her dad was just cruel. :-( :-( :-( :-( (okay, I’m over it now)

3. Sucked Into Bed Death

Victim: Glen Lantz in A Nightmare On Elm Street

Ah, my beloved Johnny Depp… I miss you, 80s & 90s Johnny Depp! Come back to us! What an awesome scene this was. Sucked into a bed! A geyser of blood! So weird but so original. And cool. 

2. Ceiling Death 

Victim: Christina “Tina” Gray in A Nightmare On Elm Street

I’ll never forget this one. Unlike a lot of Elm Street deaths in later films, which started becoming cheesy and almost played for laughs, this death was genuinely disturbing. I’ve always preferred the mood of the first film and the fact that it feels like an actual scary horror film in a way that the rest don’t. Well, I don’t need to convince anyone that the first film is by far the best – we all know that. But this was the very first slasher movie I ever watched and this death did creep me out (well, I was 13!). That’s what horror movies are meant to do, though. Yet so few manage it. 

1. Marionette Death

Victim: Phillip Anderson in A Nightmare On Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors

This one is pretty messed up. It’s also a bit gross for me but I think it’s Freddy’s most clever kill. This is the first death where I thought “Oh… That was cool”. Which is disturbing as I don’t exactly like watching people get killed! (This is why fans of only horror movies do scare me a bit). ;-) Seriously, though, who thought this scene up? Was it Frank Darabont? I’d like to think so – I’m a big fan of so much of his work. Whoever actually wrote this death is a sick & twisted genius. It still kind of grosses me out. Here you go!:

Dead Of Night (1945) Review

Dead Of Night (1945)

Directed by Cavalcanti, Charles Crichton, Basil Dearden & Robert Hamer

Written by H.G. Wells, E.F. Benson, John Baines & Angus MacPhail

Starring: Michael Redgrave, Mervyn Johns, Frederick Valk, Roland Culver

Plot Synopsis: (via IMDB)
An architect senses impending doom as his half-remembered recurring dream turns into reality. The guests at the country house encourage him to stay as they take turns telling supernatural tales.

My Opinion:

I’d been wanting to see this for a long time as I knew there was a creepy ventriloquist’s dummy in it. Not many things actually give me the creeps in horror movies but those things do!!! *shiver* So I’m happy that I finally saw this but I had no idea beforehand that it was actually a collection of several strange & eerie stories and that the dummy was only one part of those. That was kind of a nice surprise, though. It’s kind of like the original The Twilight Zone before its time (but with more of a horror theme than the quite often sci-fi theme of those). Considering that I still think the original The Twilight Zone is the greatest TV show ever, Dead Of Night was the exact sort of movie for a person like me. I just wish I’d enjoyed the stories a little more. A couple were good, a couple were okay, and the one that seemed to go on the longest was pretty weak.

In this movie, a man arrives at a party at a house in the country and claims to have seen all the guests in a dream, although he’s never met them before. He’s able to predict a couple of things that soon happen, which may or may not just be coincidences. This gets the guests each talking about their own bizarre stories which they’ve either heard about or experienced themselves. We get to see each of these stories while in between them we keep coming back to our storytellers and the stranger who claims to have met them all before.

I won’t go into too much detail on the individual stories in order to avoid spoilers. The first one involving a race car driver was possibly my favorite, although it was pretty obvious where it was headed if you’ve watched enough episodes of The Twilight Zone. But I’m certainly not going to complain at it feeling like an episode of my favorite TV show. The story told by the youngest party guest was fun and slightly creepy but, again, nothing too unexpected when you’ve watched a lot of this sort of thing. I would assume that the two most popular stories are one involving a mirror that seems to be cursed in some way and, of course, the one with the ventriloquist’s dummy as it’s the cover of every DVD I’ve seen and is what I always thought was the one and only story in the film.

I’d say these are the two most well put-together stories with the finest acting in the film. Michael Redgrave stars as the ventriloquist and, although I can’t pretend to fully know all the classic English actors, the Redgrave name is certainly well known and he does a fine job in the story that has clearly most stayed in the minds of anyone who has watched Dead Of Night. I know if I’d seen this years ago I’d have loved it. It’s very “me”. Unfortunately, I’ve just seen these sort of stories so often that the movie didn’t quite have the impact on me that it could have. It was definitely worth my time, though (despite the ghost “comedy” story, which some may love but I found to be overlong & the weakest story by far). But the mirror & the ventriloquist stories make up for the weaker ones and you may find the dummy haunting your dreams in the same way the man in the central story is haunted by dreams he can’t explain. Dead Of Night is a British supernatural horror classic that deserves more recognition than it seems to get. I wish there were more films like it nowadays.

My Rating: 7.5/10

M (1931) IMDB Top 250 Review

I’ve finally done my own IMDB Top 250 review! :-) After this week, only one more guest review will be posted then they’ll no longer be posted regularly every Tuesday. I’ll do my own sometimes but will continue to post guest reviews if & when I receive them. If you’ve signed up for any, feel free to send them to me & I’ll post them right away. Now let’s have a look at Fritz Lang’s M… 

M (1931) (German: M – Eine Stadt sucht einen Mörder — “M – A city looks for a murderer”)

IMDB Rank: 52 out of 250 on 01/01/13

Directed by Fritz Lang

Starring: Peter Lorre, Otto Wernicke, Gustaf Gründgens

Plot Synopsis: (via IMDB)
When the police in a German city are unable to catch a child-murderer, other criminals join in the manhunt.

My Opinion:

I know I started this IMDB Top 250 project as a way to force myself to finally watch a lot of classic films that I had yet to see but I’ve been very lazy about reviewing any the past couple of years, especially as I’ve had so many guest reviews to post. I’m glad I started it as I’ve discovered some films that I now adore: things like Charlie Chaplin’s movies and a surprising amount of war movies such as The Bridge On The River Kwai, which I never expected to like so much. But it’s been difficult with a few as, while I can understand why they’re so highly regarded, they just didn’t work for me. One of these was On The Waterfront so I’ve been putting off reviewing that for a year now. I’ll still eventually say something about every Top 250 film I watch but some may be multiple quickie reviews like I’ve been doing lately. I’ll get back to doing more of these myself again in the New Year. I’m just saying that, you know, don’t expect all of them to be “quality” reviews as I have surprisingly little to say about some of these classics. Not that anyone has come to expect any quality reviews from me anyway. ;-)

The point of all my rambling is this:  M is excellent and definitely deserves its place in the Top 250 but it’ll never exactly be a favorite film of mine as I’ve never been a big fan of the crime genre. I’ll talk about it a little bit, though, as some of you would probably like it a lot and I do love to bring attention to films that deserve it. And nothing makes me happier than when someone decides to watch a movie after I’ve done a post about it!

I figured I could do this as part of my October Horror thing since it’s a movie about a child killer. This is the sort of topic I’d normally avoid watching but I had no choice if I’m going to ever finish this project. Besides – it’s a movie from 1931 so I knew it would probably handle things in a respectful way & of course not be graphic in any way. If I’m going to watch a movie like this, I’d rather watch one from 1931 instead of some nasty modern day True Detective-style crime story. Sorry – I don’t normally like crime films, particularly ones about murderers, and I never have for some reason. Give me sci-fi & fantasy! (Metropolis is the Fritz Lang movie I really should have watched by now instead. I’m so ashamed…)

That M poster is awesome, though. Look at it! God they had so much more style in the old days. Although it could be a new design – what the hell do I know? And the scene involving the M on the hand was pretty damn great (I did wonder if there would actually be an M on someone’s hand). This movie is a pain in the ass to Google, though, being just one letter. Guess it’ll go at the start of the letter M in my movie review index! Which reminds me – I’d reviewed a movie for every single letter on this blog other than Q and it was really annoying me so I was planning to do Quadrophenia at some point. Then I watched & reviewed the thoroughly boring The Quiet Ones a couple of weeks ago & it didn’t even register that I’d finally done a Q movie until I put it in the index. Dammit!!! What a wasted opportunity – that movie sucked. Off topic again? Sorry!

Review actually starts NOW!

Crime films may not be my favorite genre but M is a truly excellent example of one and I’d strongly recommend it to fans of this sort of thing (someone like Zoe – I know you like your crime & detective books, Zoe!). It’s, I’m assuming, one of the very first of its type and certainly one of the very best (in my limited experience). From a filmmaking standpoint, of which I know absolutely nothing, there are some amazing shots in this that will forever remain in my mind. Ones such as this:

(Hmm – was the Alfred Hitchcock Presents TV show opening an homage to this??)

And this, which I couldn’t find a great image of, but it’s from a fabulous scene in front of a mirror shop. Very cool use of the reflections:

Plus a couple others that I won’t share as they’re big plot spoilers…

I’ll admit that the movie did drag a couple of times (for me) when the investigation was underway & detectives were doing all they could to try to figure out who the killer was. It was fascinating, though, as they were using handwriting & fingerprint analysis – it was such a different world back then and it must have been so hard to track down a serial killer. I have to say, though, that this movie feels very ahead of its time in many ways so don’t avoid it just because it’s from 1931. It’s weird to think that this is from a time when Charlie Chaplin was still making silent films (City Lights also came out in 1931) as M is a “talkie”. It feels more like the 1940’s crime films such as Hitchcock’s Shadow Of A Doubt or The Maltese Falcon (also starring Peter Lorre).

Speaking of Lorre, he’s fantastic as the murderer in this (I’ve not given anything away there – this is one of those movies where the audience knows the killer). I don’t watch as many older films as I should so, while I know Lorre’s name, I can’t say I remember him in either The Maltese Falcon or Casablanca as I barely remember those films now. I know, I know – I saw them at a very young age! I’ve been meaning to re-watch Casablanca for years & I especially want to now after seeing Lorre in this. This may sound weird but he has such a great face for this role. He’s totally believable (if that’s a good thing? I read that he was often typecast as a villain after this movie). This movie also sort of explores the psychological aspect and whether a criminal has control over their actions or not, which again made the movie feel ahead of its time. The only one slight downer is that there’s a little bit of blame placed on the murdered childrens’ mothers for “not watching them well enough”. Well, it was 1931… It was a different time!


M is one of those movies I appreciated even more after thinking about it for a while and as I wrote this review (I watched it about a month ago). Certain scenes are so iconic and I’ll never again hear Grieg’s In the Hall of the Mountain King without thinking of this movie, in which the song is used in such a memorably haunting way. Peter Lorre is fantastic and, while the middle dragged a little as the investigation was underway, the ending more than made up for it. I absolutely loved the direction the film took in the manhunt for the murderer. I highly recommend M to fans of the crime thriller genre and fully admit that it deserves to be one point higher than my rating but, as always, my ratings are based more on my own personal enjoyment of a movie. Now I really should watch Metropolis as it looks more like my type of thing – it’s ridiculous that I haven’t!

My Rating: 7.5/10

It Follows (2014) Review


Today I’m reblogging my review of It Follows. I very rarely like modern horror movies but I thought It Follows was great.

I’d also like to apologize now for having a couple of lazy reblogs this week. I have family visiting and didn’t have time to get enough new posts together for the whole week. But I have new posts for Tuesday (an IMDB Top 250 horror(ish) crime film that I watched), Wednesday (a review of a creepy British classic from 1945) & Thursday (my final horror-themed top ten of the month). And on Friday I’ll reblog my very favorite horror film from recent years. :-)

Originally posted on Cinema Parrot Disco:


It Follows (2014)

Directed by David Robert Mitchell

Maika Monroe
Keir Gilchrist
Olivia Luccardi
Lili Sepe
Daniel Zovatto

Running time: 100 minutes

Plot Synopsis: (via IMDB)
For nineteen-year-old Jay, Autumn should be about school, boys and week-ends out at the lake. But after a seemingly innocent sexual encounter, she finds herself plagued by strange visions and the inescapable sense that someone, something, is following her. Faced with this burden, Jay and her friends must find a way to escape the horrors that seem to be only a few steps behind.


My Opinion:

I’ve said it here before but I rarely like modern horror films. I did a list of My Top Ten Horror Movies (HERE) and the most current one is from 1985 (Day Of The Dead but I’d also count A Nightmare On Elm Street 3, so… 1987. Dream Warriors

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Class Of Nuke ‘Em High (1986) Review

Class Of Nuke ‘Em High (1986)

Directed by Richard W. Haines, Michael Herz, Lloyd Kaufman (as Samuel Weil)

Starring: Janelle Brady, Gil Brenton, Robert Prichard, Pat Ryan

Distributed by Troma Entertainment

Plot Synopsis: (via IMDB)
The pupils at a high school next to a nuclear power plant start acting and looking strange after buying contaminated drugs from a plant worker.

My Opinion:

You know that I’ve watched an absolute load of shit in preparation for my blog’s month of horror when a goddamn Troma movie isn’t the worst one that I saw. Honestly, it’s probably somewhere in the middle. And it’s utter shit! Of course it is! But it pisses toxic green liquid all over The Victim and Repo! The Genetic Opera. I also preferred it to The Quiet Ones, possibly to Let’s Scare Jessica To Death, and maybe even to Mama. (These were all so bad that I did mini-reviews for most of them together in one post HERE and a longer review for Mama HERE, in which I now think I was a little too harsh). Troma movies are meant to be bad, though. Right?! I don’t think that the others I mentioned were meant to be bad. Therefore, they’re actually worse whereas I can be more forgiving of a Troma film. I guess.

I kept wanting to stick a roll of toilet paper on that guy’s nose ring.

I’m not going to pretend that I like Troma films. They’re godawful and a chore to watch. They’re bad to the point of being unwatchable as opposed to “so bad they’re fun”. I’ve done this as part of my horror comedy week since I think all their films are meant to be a part of this genre even though they’re completely unfunny and not at all scary. Right? Having said that, however, I’m now going to totally confuse everyone and say that I think every movie blogger should watch at least one of them before they can truly call themselves movie bloggers. It should be, like, a rite of passage or something.

My Troma experience is limited. Back in college, I saw the first three Toxic Avenger movies when they were on TV three nights in a row and I developed a sort of a fascination with them. If you’re going to watch only one of these, I’d suggest The Toxic Avenger as it’s somewhat watchable. At least, to a 20-year-old it was… I’m sure I’d struggle making it through those three films again. (Dan at Slip/Through has done a really good review of The Toxic Avenger HERE that you should give a read if you’re interested – he’s more likely to talk you into watching it than I am!).

I also attempted to watch Tromeo & Juliet once just to see the penis monster thing but ended up just watching the whole movie on fast-forward. Seriously. Here you go – you can skip that movie now. You’re welcome:

That’s it – those are the only Tromas I’ve seen (unless you count Studio Ghibli’s masterpiece My Neighbor Totoro which, believe it or not, a sub-division of Troma Films first distributed to the West with their own dubbed version. so… thank you for that, Troma!!!). The only other one I ever had any interest in seeing was Class Of Nuke ‘Em High as I always thought it sounded like it at least had a decent idea for a story. Guess I’m just a fan of the toxic chemicals thing. So, I’ve finally watched it! I’m done now! I’ve had my fill! I’m done watching these!


Did I even talk about Class Of Nuke ‘Em High?! I guess not. You know what? It honestly doesn’t matter. The idea of a Troma film is far better than the actual experience of watching one anyway. The posters & the images almost make Troma films look like they’d be entertaining. This one has a pretty good title, at least, and actually has a fairly fun poster: “Readin’, Writin’, and Radiation!” Ha! So stupid! But still better than anything in the movie. However, even though I’ve not seen many, I’d venture to guess that Class Of Nuke ‘Em High is one of the “better” offerings from this studio. I didn’t hate it – it was exactly as shit as I expected it to be. If that makes sense. It wasn’t fun to watch but I didn’t get mad at it wasting my time as I knew what I was getting into when I hit the Play button. It’s almost as “somewhat watchable” as The Toxic Avenger, which is the closest I can get to giving it a compliment. I guess. So my rating is more on a “Troma scale of 1 to 10” (just to confuse Brian since he always complains about my confusing ratings). I suppose I can call this my “second favorite Troma film” but do yourself a favor & just watch The Toxic Avenger instead of this one. It’s everyone’s duty as a serious movie blogger.

My Rating: 5/10

(Actually, that rating still makes no sense as this is probably 8/10 on an actual “Troma scale”. Aw, fuck it- who cares? it’s shit!)

My Top Ten Horror Comedies 

I love a good horror comedy! Horror isn’t exactly my favorite genre, especially in recent years, but horror comedy is something that I really enjoy when a film gets the balance right.

With this list, I found it even harder to define “horror comedy” than I did to define “body horror” for last week’s top ten. This time, I won’t bore you all with a rambling explanation of why I’ve excluded certain movies – I’ll just list those at the end. This time, I’ll get straight to my list.

So here are My Top Ten Horror Comedies, counting down to my favorite:

10. TIE: Zombieland & Warm Bodies

9. TIE: Grabbers & Tremors

8. Tucker And Dale Vs Evil

7. Night Of The Creeps

6. Fright Night

5. Shaun Of The Dead

4. Night Of The Comet

3. An American Werewolf In London

2. The Return Of The Living Dead

1. Gremlins

Honorable Mentions:
– Gremlins 2: The New Batch
– Creepshow
Dead Snow
– The Cabin In The Woods
– Killer Klowns From Outer Space
– Black Sheep
– Teeth
– Eight Legged Freaks
What We Do In The Shadows

Ones I’ve Excluded:

Some of my top ten are iffy & I’m not sure if I’d really consider all of them horror comedies. Oh well – I didn’t want to stress about it! I worked off of this list at Wikipedia but there were some that I really didn’t agree with so these are the ones that I excluded. I love these! Just don’t consider them horror comedies…

Ghostbusters (excellent, funny movie. horror, though? no. just be happy that I included Gremlins – I think that one is very borderline on the “horror” too)
The Lost Boys (hubby & I disagreed on this one – he said it’s not horror & I said it’s not comedy. whatever it is, it’s still a favorite of mine)
The ‘Burbs (just a comedy)
Phantom Of The Paradise (no. why does Wikipedia consider this a horror comedy?)
Beetlejuice (not really a “horror”)
Slither (it’s great but I put it on last week’s list – it is a horror comedy but I still think of it more as a body horror)

What We Do In The Shadows (2014) Review

What We Do In The Shadows (2014)

Directed & Written by Taika Waititi & Jemaine Clement

Starring: Taika Waititi, Jemaine Clement, Rhys Darby, Jonathan Brugh, Cori Gonzalez-Macuer, Stu Rutherford

Plot Synopsis: (via IMDB)
Viago, Deacon, and Vladislav are vampires who are finding that modern life has them struggling with the mundane – like paying rent, keeping up with the chore wheel, trying to get into nightclubs, and overcoming flatmate conflicts.

My Opinion:

Finally! I finally saw this! I remember contemplating going into London to watch this last year as nowhere local to me was playing it. I hate that. Was it worth the wait? Yeah, it’s pretty damn funny. I liked it! Would it have been worth a journey into London just to watch it? Hmm… Not really.

I don’t have a lot to say about this one, to be honest. It’s not that I didn’t enjoy it – it’s just that the quote up there on the poster,”The Spinal Tap of vampire movies“, is all that really needs to be said. It’s a mockumentary about a group of vampires with very different personalities (thanks in part to their vast age differences) who live together in a flat. There are some pretty clever jokes and I thought they did a good job covering a lot of aspects of modern day life that centuries-old vampires would struggle with. I mean, seriously – it’s gotta be hard to go out for a night on the town when you actually have to be invited into any of the bars & clubs you wish to visit. I far prefer these socially awkward vampire misfits to the cool & sexy Interview With The Vampire types. Or those Twilight twats!

I’ve had a Flight Of The Conchords DVD collecting dust in my house for years. Well, it’s not been collecting dust as long as my too-expensive Lars Von Trier Riget DVD set… God I used to buy way too many DVDs that I never watched! Anyway, maybe I should dust off Flight Of The Conchords now? Did anyone here watch that show? Based on this movie, if the humor is similar since it’s from the same dude, I suppose I should finally check it out. What We Do In The Shadows is certainly not as funny as This Is Spinal Tap, though. No no no. No way! But no mockumentary will ever beat that one. This movie is my type of thing, though, and I say this too often lately but I do appreciate that movies like this still get made sometimes. They make up for all the utter shit out there! I wish more cinemas would give them a chance and I wouldn’t have to travel into London just to have the opportunity to see films that are remotely interesting or original. It’s also cool that the characters are so different in this that anyone watching the movie will probably have a favorite. I’m sure I’m not alone in liking Petyr the most. Gotta love that crazy Nosferatu-looking bastard! Even if he really doesn’t pull his weight as a flatmate. 


Umm… Shit. Yeah – like the poster says, this is really just the Spinal Tap of vampire movies. There you go! I realize this is a super short review but you can’t say it any better than that. You either like that sort of thing or you don’t. I do. And, yes, any movie that references The Lost Boys will earn bonus points with me. ;-) But will this movie make the obvious Top Ten I’ll be doing tomorrow (My Top Ten Horror Comedies)? You’ll just have to wait & see! 

My Rating: 7.5/10

Waxwork (1988) Review

**I’m skipping the IMDB Top 250 thing today & posting another Horror Comedy review for my Horror Comedy-Themed Week! Woohoo! More fun than boring Top 250 films anyway.** ;-)

Waxwork (1988)

Directed by Anthony Hickox

Starring: Zach Galligan, Deborah Foreman, Michelle Johnson, David Warner, Dana Ashbrook, Miles O’Keeffe, Patrick Macnee, John Rhys-Davies

Plot Synopsis: (via IMDB)
A wax museum owner uses his horror exhibits to unleash evil on the world.

My Opinion:

You know how you have certain movies on your “Watchlist” for years and for some reason you just never saw them? Waxwork was one of those for me. I don’t know why the hell I never saw it. An 80’s horror (comedy-ish) movie starring my beloved Zach Galligan! (Who, by the way, follows me on Twitter. I’m so proud of that fact. Hi Zach!). ;-) Anyway, it took me a very long time but I’m glad I finally saw this one. What a relief after watching a load of shit for the blog this October to finally see one that I actually enjoyed!

Waxwork is quite odd. I liked that! I didn’t really know what to expect but always thought it was more of a straight-up horror. It’s not quite what I’d call a “horror comedy” as it isn’t strong on the comedy but it also doesn’t take itself seriously, which I think works better for a movie like this. As it’s kind of hard to classify, though, it may be why it wasn’t as big of a film as it could have been. It’s also much more violent than I was expecting for the somewhat lighthearted nature! It’s not exactly extreme by today’s standards and the gore is very dated in that 1988 kind of way but this may be another reason why it wasn’t as big of a movie at the time. I’d also say it’s aimed at an older audience with characters such as the Marquis de Sade & scenes of a slightly sexual nature plus the movie’s use of famous older British actors (like, aimed at late teens/early twenties). Waxwork is kind of a weird sort of mishmash of styles. But I liked it! Granted, regulars here will be aware of my age and the fact that I tend to like most movies from the Eighties & am often much more forgiving of their flaws than I am with current films.

Anyway, these two college girls are walking down the street when they suddenly notice this waxwork museum which seems to have appeared out of nowhere. Then the above creepy British guy from The Omen appears, tells them it’s his, and invites them and their friends to come & see his horror-themed wax exhibits that evening.

One of the girls is a bitchy slut and one is a nice virgin because, of course, all girls fall into one of these two categories! The bitchy slut is played by Michelle Johnson, who has very large breasts (you can check out her IMDB page if you want proof) and the nice virgin is played by Deborah Foreman from 80’s horror classic April Fool’s Day, which I keep putting off reviewing each October for some reason. I like that so many people in this movie were in some pretty damn awesome other films (as well as The Omen and April Fool’s Day we have, of course, adorable Zach Galligan from Gremlins, John Rhys-Davies from the Indiana Jones films, Patrick Macnee from The Howling, and some other small actors from other horror films not really worth mentioning). Waxwork isn’t as good as these films but I appreciate the effort they put into the cast for this. Zach Galligan is sort of dating/broken-up-with the bitchy slut so he goes along with the group of friends to the waxwork museum.

What I really liked about Waxwork is that it’s got a great idea even if it’s somewhat poorly (and weirdly) executed. There are all these wax exhibits of famous villains and monsters throughout history (vampires, werewolves, zombies, mummies, the Marquis de Sade dude I mentioned, etc). I don’t think it’s exactly a spoiler to say that these exhibits are somehow alive and that our college students are in for some trouble when they visit this creepy British dude’s wax museum in the middle of the night. What follows are a series of different stories as these college kids are each “sucked into” the different horror displays. The best (and bloodiest) story is probably the bitchy slut’s journey into the vampire display.

The movie really could have used more of these individual stories as they were a lot of fun but there’s too much focus on the overall story of the wax museum and why its owner is seeking out victims for his wax creations. It’s a pretty silly and convoluted set-up just to have a movie showing college kids getting killed by various historical figures but I appreciate the effort as those scenes make the movie worth your time if you’re an 80’s movie-lover and missed out on this one like I did. The ending is pretty crazy and SO over-the-top but, hell, I didn’t mind that. It’s a horror comedy, after all, so you’re not meant to take it seriously. I now really want to see the sequel, Waxwork II: Lost In Time, which looks… not so great. But I’m totally going to watch it anyway. I’ll review it next October if I’m still doing this blogging thing! I’m also going to mainly stick to just watching horror films from the Seventies & Eighties as I always enjoy those the most. I recommend Waxwork as I liked it a lot but I’d only really recommend it to other fans of horror movies from the Eighties. If you’re of a similar age to me, I promise you’ll have fun watching this one.

My Rating: 7.5/10

Dead Snow 2: Red Vs Dead (2014) Review

**Welcome to Horror Comedy Week on Cinema Parrot Disco! I actually got my shit together enough to have an actual theme this week! Okay, it wasn’t originally my plan but I realized that I’d watched enough horror comedies to have a themed week. Yay!**


Dead Snow 2: Red vs. Dead (2014) (Norwegian: Død Snø 2)

Directed by Tommy Wirkola

Starring: Vegar Hoel, Orjan Gamst, Martin Starr, Ingrid Haas, Jocelyn DeBoer, Stig Frode Henriksen, Kristoffer Joner

Plot Synopsis: (via IMDB)
Still on the run from a group of Nazi zombies, a man seeks the aid of a group of American zombie enthusiasts, and discovers new techniques for fighting the zombies.

My Opinion:

I really liked the first Dead Snow (I reviewed it HERE). I mean, it’s full of Norwegians and NAZI ZOMBIES for crying out loud. That’s so awesomely crazy. Then the second film came out and all I heard was that it was absolutely hilarious and even better than the first one so I of course had to check it out. I actually bought both of these on DVD. Does anyone do that anymore? I buy hardly any these days – I miss physical copies of movies! And I miss physical copies of music even more. *sigh* I miss the old days… Tangent over! The first Dead Snow is far better than the sequel. Sorry sequel lovers! Dead Snow 2 definitely ups the comedy BIG TIME and I did get some laughs out of it but it goes so far overboard that, as a film, it pales in comparison to the originality and the subtle dark humor of the first film. Plus, where’s the fucking SNOW in this one?!

(See? I was so proud of my foreign DVD haul when I picked up Dead Snow that I tweeted this photo in March 2014. That’s probably the last time I bought so many at once.)

I’m not going to say that you shouldn’t watch this one if you liked the first one. It’s definitely worth checking out if you did but be aware that it’s a very different film. As this is a sequel, there will be slight spoilers for the first film (but I’ll still try to avoid spoiling things too much as I really want any zom-com lovers to watch the first film). Anyway, when you fall behind on horror movies you can’t help but know who survives the previous film when they’re clearly in the sequel, so… The survivor from the first film is our hero in this one and I like him so was happy to have that link to the first film.

He’s the best thing about the sequel (along with that other guy in the picture, who was a fun new addition) and, without him, I’d have enjoyed this movie far less. He’s the only true link here due to there not only being NO SNOW in this one but, also, our main Nazi zombie from the first movie is so completely different in this one. In Dead Snow 2, the Nazi zombies aren’t really threatening or scary – they’re just silly. Well, the whole movie is just plain silly.

Silly! That’s really the best way to describe the comedy in the sequel and, while I’m certainly not above “silly” (I still crack up at the silliest knock knock jokes), I just usually prefer my comedy to be a little more subtle and less over-the-top. Which is “funny” as I remember my main complaint about the first film was that it wasn’t funny enough. Maybe there’s just no satisfying me! ;-) Well, I take back that original complaint as this movie took it a little too far. Maybe Dead Snow 3 can find the perfect comedic balance! I’d still watch a third film as I really did enjoy both of these films despite my complaints.

Yes, I did enjoy this one despite my negative-sounding review! I just can’t help but compare it to the first film… Sorry! I can see why some people like this one more – I guess it just depends on what type of movie you prefer. Plus, I really hated the “American zombie enthusiasts” who help our hero fight the Nazi zombies. I found them annoying and completely unfunny (even the Star Wars nerd-girl!). They’re the worst example in this of “trying too hard” whereas the horror-movie-loving-nerd from the first movie was a lot of fun and a really likeable character. Plus, the back & forth language thing between Norwegian & English once the Americans arrived was actually very distracting (and confusing, in a way, as I didn’t immediately realize that I was no longer reading subtitles! Odd).

I’m going to wrap this up as I’m sounding negative again & I don’t want to be that way as I would definitely recommend both of these movies to horror comedy lovers (especially zom-com lovers). Despite some annoying new characters, there are quite a few funny moments and I did laugh out loud a few times (like with that kid in the hospital room. Funny!). I just prefer the characters and the “spirit” of the first film (and the fact that there’s actually SNOW in the movie, which is pretty damn important, yeah? Blood-splattered snow & all that? It’s a big selling point! There’s snow on the damn poster for this so at least the poster-maker realized its aesthetic importance).

I’ve realized while writing this what it is about this movie compared to the first one and I really shouldn’t make this comparison as my knowledge is limited on the movies I’m about to mention, but… Here I go anyway! When I was about 18, I rented The Evil Dead and Evil Dead II and wasn’t really the biggest fan of them so I’ve not watched them since (although I do appreciate their importance). So, I don’t remember them well but I do remember preferring the first one while the second one went all silly, right? That’s exactly the same with Dead Snow & Dead Snow 2 so, thinking about it, it makes perfect sense as the Snow films both owe a lot to and reference great classic horror movies, especially the Dead films (without giving away too much, the Evil Dead II arm thing plays an important part in Dead Snow 2). Holy shit – these are clearly an homage to the Evil Dead films and I only fully realized that while writing this review. I’m such an idiot! Ignore everything I said before this paragraph! ;-) If you’re a fan of the Evil Dead films, you’ll love the Dead Snow films too! Huh. Well, damn… I guess Dead Snow 3: Nazi Zombie Army Of Snowless Darkness comes next. I’ll watch that but I’ll still always like the first one the most.

My Rating: 6/10